Well - Summer 2014 - page 4-5

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WELL
| SUMMER 2014
SUMMER 2014 |
WELL
5
VACATION SURVIVAL KITS
When it comes to travel, you can never be too prepared for a health emergency. When
you’re in a foreign place, a vacation survival kit can offer first-aid support in a crisis or
threatening situation. Here’s a go-to vacation survival kit list that will keep you and your
family safe in a variety of settings.
SLATHER ON
SUNSCREEN
Read the label. Look for
an SPF (sun protection
factor) that’s 30 or higher
and pick one that is
“broad spectrum,” which
protects from ultraviolet
A and ultraviolet B rays,
the leading cancer-
causers. Opt for water-
resistant sunscreen, but
they only last for a max
of 80 minutes—so you’ll
need to re-apply.
GIVE THE GIFT OF LIFE
Give your parents the gift of life. Heart disease is still the nation’s #1 killer, so offer to
accompany them to the doctor’s office for a heart health physical check-up. Typically
this will include a routine physical and a basic blood test to determine lipid profiles, like
HDL, LDL and triglycerides (blood fats). A fasting blood glucose test determines risks of
diabetes, which nearly triples heart disease odds. An electrocardiogram (ECG) provides a
record of the heart’s electrical impulses and can detect whether the heart is damaged, if
you’ve had a heart attack or if there is decreased blood flow to the heart muscle.
The ABCDEs of Skin Cancer
Skin cancer is still the most common type of cancer. Melanoma
accounts for less than 2% of all skin cancer cases—basal and
squamous cell are more typical. But it’s responsible for the most
deaths: more than 9,000 annually. The odds of getting melanoma
spike with age, but even young sun worshippers are vulnerable.
To protect yourself, learn the simple danger signs you and your
family should be aware of when it comes to moles, brown spots
and skin growths. Check out the ABCDEs of melanoma. If a mole
or growth on your body has one or more of these signs, schedule
an appointment with your doctor.
Health Briefs
Health Briefs
D
B
E
A
Asymmetry
When split in half,
the halves are not
matching.
Border
The borders of the
mole are uneven,
not rounded.
Evolution
The mole has
changed in sym-
metry, shape, size,
color or diameter.
Diameter
The mole is larger
in diameter than
the eraser on a
standard pencil.
C
Color
There are multiple
colors or shades
in one mole.
TRAVELING ABROAD
Make sure your family is up-to-date on their
vaccinations. While you may feel your destination
is safe, vaccination policies vary internationally, and
most vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks take
place in less developed regions. Visit the CDC’s
website to learn about the most recent outbreaks,
necessary vaccines and travel precautions your
family should keep in mind for summer excursions.
cdc.gov/travel/contentVaccinations.aspx
At a theme park:
1.
Antiseptic wipes and
sanitary towelettes—for
keeping hands clean and
flushing out wounds
2.
Antibiotic ointment—for
cuts and scrapes
3.
Band-aids of various
sizes—for unexpected cuts
4.
A small bottle of your
prescription pills—just in
case someone in your family
forgot to take their meds
5.
Small hard candies—for
low blood pressure or to
ease sugar level drops
The basics:
1.
Combo ice pack/heat pack—
for overheating or fever chills
2.
Chewable antihistamine
(like Benadryl or Claritin)
and acetaminophen (like
Tylenol)—for unanticipated
reactions or illness
3.
Hydrogen peroxide and
antibiotic ointment—for cuts
or scrapes needing first aid
4.
Tweezers and medical
scissors—for cutting bandages
or pulling a foreign object out
of skin, etc.
5.
Nonstick gauze bandages
and Band-aids—for other
wounds, minor or otherwise
At the beach:
1.
Aloe vera and distilled white
vinegar—for sunburns and
jellyfish stings
2.
Waterproof sunscreen with
broad spectrum and at least 30 SPF
3.
Saline solution and eardrops—
for sanitizing wounds and flushing
out swimmer’s ears
4.
Insect repellent—for avoiding
bites by insects carrying disease
5.
Dramamine—for motion
sickness
In the mountains, hiking:
1.
Insect repellent—insect
bites increase the risk of
disease contraction
2.
Elastic bandages and
compression bandages—if
constriction or compression
are necessary for injury
3.
Insect sting relief pads—
for nasty bug bites or attacks
4.
4x4 sterile bandages—to
cover large wounds
5.
Moleskin—to wrap large
wounds
or yogurt and lay on a plate
covered in wax paper. Add
cinnamon, sprinkles, nuts or
other small toppings. Freeze
and enjoy!
SUMMER
NUTRITION TIPS
School is out for summer, and
the kids are home all day long to
snack and fill up on junk food.
Here are some easy “snack-
on-a-stick” ideas for healthy
summertime munchies that
are great to have around the
house—and fun to make too.
Juice Popsicles:
Fill ice cube
trays with 100% juice, cover
with foil and pierce each cube
centrally with a toothpick
or popsicle stick cut in half.
Freeze and enjoy!
Watermelon Pops:
Cut a
watermelon into 1-inch-thick
slices. Use a cookie cutter
to cut out fun shapes in the
watermelon. Pierce with a
popsicle stick and enjoy!
Rainbow Skewers:
Using
brightly colored produce,
have the kids help organize
fruit slices like the colors of
the rainbow. Spear the fruit
rainbows on BBQ skewers for a
fun and colorful summer treat.
Sandwich on a Stick:
Make a
sandwich with meat, desirable
spreads, lettuce and healthy
whole-wheat bread. Cut the
sandwich into square, 1-inch
cubes. Using cheese cubes,
cherry tomatoes, olives and
the squared sandwich pieces,
arrange on BBQ skewers and
bon appétit!
Fruit Pops:
After removing the
stem, pierce large strawberries
or 2-inch banana slices with
popsicle or cake pop sticks;
do not fully pierce the fruit.
Dip the speared strawberry or
banana in melted chocolate
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